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Naturally, when you think of Las Vegas the first thing that pops into your head is not taking a tour the Neon Museum. And if it is then you and I would get along fabulously. But I am here to tell you that if time allows and you have a general interest in Vegas/Americana history and a little kitsch, a guided tour at the Neon Museum is well worth your time (hint: a guided tour is the only way to experience the museum).

Neon Museum
Casino signs in the boneyard of the Neon Museum

I’ve already talked about my time at the Neon Museum in Las Vegas (with a larger photo gallery) here but wanted to write a post that was more descriptive of the tour itself. Since opening in 2012, the Neon Museum “boneyard” is gaining steam quickly with a over a record breaking 100k visitors in 2016 alone. Here’s what you’ll need to know if you plan to go on a tour.

What Should I know about Touring the Neon Museum?

The museum is located pretty far north on Las Vegas boulevard—even further north than (old) downtown Vegas and Fremont Street. They have a free parking lot but if you are traveling without a car (as most do in Vegas) you can take the double decker Deuce bus to get there as well. This is the mode of transportation I chose and it took me a little over an hour to get there from Caesars Palace which is about half way up the strip—so plan accordingly if this is how you choose to travel to the museum. Of course, there’s always Lyft/Uber/cabs.

You must book your timed tickets ahead online (and they will sell out quickly) as space is limited and tickets are not transferable meaning if you arrive early you will still have to wait for your designated tour time and if you arrive more than 20 minutes late you may forfeit your spot on tour. You’ll check in at the La Concha which is a very Space Age, mid-century former motel lobby. They have a small gift shop to check out while you wait.

Neon Museum
The old Stardust casino sign in the boneyard of the museum

From there, your guide will gather your group (small, I would say under 20 people) and you’ll head into what they call the neon boneyard. And this is where it gets cool. Your tour around the boneyard will last roughly an hour and your guide will tell all kinds of stories about the old neon signs you see—casino/restaurant/mob/Vegas strip history go hand in hand with these signs and you really get a feeling that you’re strolling through the golden age of Las Vegas—like the rat pack may be right around the corner. Still photos on tour are welcomed and encouraged, however, audio and video recording is prohibited. The museum does not let you wander the boneyard after the tour concludes so make sure you are getting those pictures in as you go along.

I chose a daytime tour in September and it was HOT. Vegas is the desert after all and you are outside in the open air for the tour so come prepared with a bottle of water (they also sell these in the lobby). The Neon Museum also offers night tours and a limited number of signs still light up (restoration is a lengthy and costly process) so it really depends on your time schedule and what you’re in the mood for.

Adult ticket prices are $19 for day and $25 for night tours (current February 2017). For other FAQs of the museum click here.

 

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Have time for a video? Check out this story about the lights at the museum from CBS Sunday Morning

Tags : artgroup tourlas vegasneon museumneon signstourtravel
Lauren Jones

The author Lauren Jones

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